Launch Slideshow

Flush With Options

Flush With Options

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    American Standard

    American Standard. The high-efficiency, dual-flush FloWise toilet lets users choose a 1.6-gallon or 0.8-gallon flush and is WaterSense certified. The white toilet has an elongated bowl and is available in standard or taller “right height” sizes. 800.899.2614. www.americanstandard-us.com.
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    Mansfield

    Mansfield. The high-performance, high-efficiency EcoQuantum toilet features pressure-assist, dual-flush technology with a dual-action trip lever that triggers a 1.1-gallon or a 1.6-gallon flush, depending on which way the user pulls the lever. The ADA-compliant, WaterSense-certified unit measures 17?1/4 inches high and qualifies for many water-district rebate programs, the company says. The toilet comes in white, biscuit, and classic bone. 877.850.3060. www.mansfieldplumbing.com.
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    Niagara. The WaterSense-certified Ecologic Flapperless toilet uses tip-bucket technology to create a high-performance, 1.28-gallon flush. The unit features a maintenance-free flush system, and no tank sweating or need to replace flappers, chains, or levers, the company claims. 800.668.4420. www.niagaraflapperless.ca.
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    Quality Craft. 3000 Series toilets are WaterSense certified and MaP approved to dispose of 900 grams in a single flush, according to the company. The toilets feature a 3.3-inch flush valve that maximizes flushing force and a rim wash to clean away debris and bacteria, the manufacturer says. The 2?1/8-inch trapway prevents plugging. A dual-flush feature lets users push one button to flush liquids at 1.1 gpf, or a second button to flush solids at 1.6 gpf. The elongated, comfort-height bowl is ADA approved. 604.575.5550. www.qualitycraft.com.
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    Toto. One- and two-piece Gwyneth high-efficiency toilets feature a 1.28-gpf gravity-fed double-cyclone flush engine. The toilet is WaterSense certified and qualifies for select water utility rebate programs, the manufacturer says. The unit is 17 inches from base to seat, and it cleans itself during each flush as water from two nozzles removes debris and bacteria from the concave rim channel, the company says. 888.295.8134. www.totousa.com.
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    Foremost. The All-in-One elongated version of the dual-flush, 1000 Gram HET toilet is WaterSense certified and uses 1.1 gallons of water for liquids and 1.6 gallons for solids, saving up to 16,000 gallons of water per year for a family of four versus 3.5-gpf models, the company claims. The company’s patented power-assisted flush system uses water to compress air and remove the maximum amount of solid waste. Antimicrobial protection is built into the toilet. 800.443.1410. www.foremostgroups.com.
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    Caroma. The company claims its Sydney Smart dual-flush, WaterSense-certified toilet saves more than 18,000 gallons of water per household per year compared to 3.5-gpf single-flush toilets, and more than 5,000 gallons over 1.6-gpf, single-flush toilets. Users may choose a 0.8- or 1.28-gallon flush, which averages out to 0.89 gallons per flush. The toilet features wash-down flushing and a trapway nearly twice as large as the industry average. 800.605.4218. www.caromausa.com.
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    Zurn

    Zurn. The Z5798 Pint, a low-consumption urinal, uses 0.125 gallon per flush. A long-life battery controls the unit’s hands-free flushing operation and lasts for about 200,000 flush cycles, the company says. The urinal saves more than 30,000 gallons of water a year over standard, 1-gpf urinals, the manufacturer says. 800.997.3876. www.zurn.com.
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    Lorne Resnick

    Jacuzzi. The Espree high-efficiency, 1.28-gpf toilet is WaterSense certified, so it uses 20% less water than 1.6-gpf models. The unit features a concealed trapway and an elongated, chair-height bowl that meets ADA standards. 800.288.4002. www.jacuzzi.com.
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    Kohler. The company’s WaterSense-certified Saile toilet is a seamless, one-piece, dual-flush unit designed to eliminate liquid or bulk waste with a single flush. The two-button actuator lets users choose 1.6 or 0.8 gpf. A family of four can save, on average, up to 8,000 gallons of water each year with the 0.8-gallon flush (versus 3.5-gpf models), according to the company. The toilet seat features an over-molded lid that covers the seat ring for a finished look. The device has a skirted toilet and is designed for flush-to-wall installation. 800.456.4537. www.kohler.com.

Besides, notes Cairns, president of A.H.C. Mechanical Contractors, he hasn’t had a callback on a 1.6-gpf toilet in 10 years.

How Low Can They Go?
The choice may not be optional for long. California, for example, will require all new toilets to be HETs by 2014. The Golden State has repeatedly proven itself as a standard-setter for the rest of the nation when it comes to green building legislation, and this may not be any different.

Manufacturers can comply by reducing water use to 1.28 gpf or by introducing dual-flush toilets, which feature separate flushing options for disposing of liquid and solid waste. On most dual-flush models, the liquid flush uses just 0.8 gallon, while the solid removal uses 1.6 gallons. Because users dispose of liquids three times more often than solids, water use for a dual-flush toilet averages out at 1.28 gallons per flush, so they meet WaterSense and California standards.

A few toilet makers have whittled water use even lower. Kohler’s one-piece San Raphael Pressure Lite toilet, for example, consumes just 1 gallon for every flush and can save a four-person household up to 20,000 gallons of water a year over pre-low-flush models, the company says.

That might be as low as they can go. After waste leaves the toilet bowl, it has to push through a drain line for 60 feet or so until it reaches the sewer system. Ultra-low-water toilets might have trouble “kicking it to the curb,” says James Walsh, American Standard’s product director for Chinaware.

But there are other means of lowering water consumption in the new American bathroom beyond simply using new toilet technologies. Capturing increasing attention are urinals, which can use as little as an eighth of a gallon of water per use. These are familiar and convenient fixtures in public men’s rooms—and are slowly finding their way into homes as their designs become more pleasing to women, manufacturers say.