A growing number of manufacturers and studios already known for the quality of their work and design are looking to differentiate themselves on another axis—environmental sustainability. This week’s roundup features a handful of furnishings borne from this movement—including a sound-blocking luminaire made from recycled materials, a biodegradable hand-woven rug, and a pair of colorful, eco-friendly chairs.

Tatami, Nanimarquina
Made from 50% New Zealand wool and 50% jute, Tatami is hand-loomed by craftsmen in India. Informed by Japanese-style straw tatami mats, the biodegradable rugs are offered in natural, black (shown), indigo, purple, and yellow.

Credit: Nanimarquina



Broom Chair and Barstool, Philippe Starck
Philippe Starck added a chair and barstool to his Broom Collection for Emeco. Made from 75% waste polypropylene,15% reclaimed wood fiber, and 10% glass fiber and pigment, the seating pieces are offered in natural, green, orange, yellow, dark gray, and white colors. The chair measures 19” wide, 19.5” deep, and 32.5” tall; the barstool measures 17.25” wide, 16.5” deep, and 43.25” tall. 

Credit: Emeco



Hush, David Trubridge
Developed by Marion Courtillé for the New Zealand–based David Trubridge lighting studio, Hush is an LED fixture designed to absorb sound. It features a shade of synthetic felt panels made entirely from polyester fibers and includes a minimum of 65% post-consumer recycled material. Offered in six colors (gray, shown).

Credit: David Trubridge



Notes, Luca Nichetto
From Italian designer Luca Nichetto for Swedish studio Offecct, Notes is a collection of five acoustic panels that also function as space dividers. Inspired by laundry drying outdoors on lines strung between houses, the partitioning panels are made of recyclable felt with contents derived from upholstery-production waste. They are installed on a suspended track and can be rearranged as space needs change.

Credit: Offecct



Skinny Planks, Interface
With a legacy of combining healthy materials and high-design, sustainable-minded carpet manufacturer Interface is adding a new dimension to its collection of modular flooring. The 23cm-wide-by-1m-long plank-style carpet tiles help designers integrate features such as wayfinding and work area demarcations into a floor plan. Skinny Planks join Interface’s existing line of modular tiles, which include 50cm-wide-by-1m-long planks, 1m squares, and 50cm squares.

Credit: Interface



LED T8 Replacement Tubes, Cree
Cree designed its T8 Series linear replacement tubes with an oval-shaped LED arrangement to allow for more uplight and a more uniform distribution compared to 32W LED T8 lamps. Each lamp delivers 2,100 lumens at 3500K and 4000K and a 90+ color rendering index, and it consumes 30% less energy than peer linear fluorescent tubes, the company says. The dimmable lamps are suited for use in applications including education, retail, and offices.

Credit: Cree