Launch Slideshow

The jury appreiated how architect David Webber minimized the look of an addition that nearly doubled the original house size. They commented that Webber "created a definite juxtaposition" between old and new, but that the addition "doesn't dominate the exisitng house, which the architect let be its own thing."

Jewell Street

Jewell Street

  • The jury appreiated how architect David Webber minimized the look of an addition that nearly doubled the original house size. They commented that Webber "created a definite juxtaposition" between old and new, but that the addition "doesn't dominate the exisitng house, which the architect let be its own thing."

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    The jury appreiated how architect David Webber minimized the look of an addition that nearly doubled the original house size. They commented that Webber "created a definite juxtaposition" between old and new, but that the addition "doesn't dominate the exisitng house, which the architect let be its own thing."

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    McConnell Photography

    The jury appreciated how architect David Webber minimized the look of an addition that nearly doubled the original house size. They commented that Webber "created a definite juxtaposition" between old and new, but that the addition "doesn't dominate the existing house, which the architect let be its own thing."

  • Webber largely left the existing 900-square-foot bungalow alone except for a slight facelift using locally sourced Cypress applied as a rainscreen.

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    Webber largely left the existing 900-square-foot bungalow alone except for a slight facelift using locally sourced Cypress applied as a rainscreen.

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    McConnell Photography

    Webber largely left the existing 900-square-foot bungalow alone except for a slight facelift using locally sourced Cypress applied as a rainscreen.

  • Webber speced budget-friendly and durable materials such as fiber cement and metal roofing as siding.

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    Webber speced budget-friendly and durable materials such as fiber cement and metal roofing as siding.

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    McConnell Photography

    Webber speced budget-friendly and durable materials such as fiber cement and metal roofing as siding.

  • Cool gray hues give the living/dining areas in the original house a quiet and relaxing feel.

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    Cool gray hues give the living/dining areas in the original house a quiet and relaxing feel.

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    McConnell Photography

    Cool gray hues give the living/dining areas in the original house a quiet and relaxing feel.

  • The white, glassy kitchen addition provides an airy counterpoint to the cool, dark living room in the existing house.

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    The white, glassy kitchen addition provides an airy counterpoint to the cool, dark living room in the existing house.

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    McConnell Photography

    The white, glassy kitchen addition provides an airy counterpoint to the cool, dark living room in the existing house.

  • View from breakfast nook through the kitchen to dining and living spaces beyond.

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    View from breakfast nook through the kitchen to dining and living spaces beyond.

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    McConnell Photography

    View from breakfast nook through the kitchen to dining and living spaces beyond.

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    A deep roof overhang on the addition continues down the wall to provide protection from southern exposure for the master suite balcony.

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    The second story extends well beyond the glass walls of the new kitchen below to create a shady outdoor eating area.

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    A slight separation between the existing house and new addition allows each volume to maintain a distinct identity. Twin sets of double glass doors enclose that in-between space and bring light into the center of the house.

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    The scale and distinctive pattern of the fiber cement panels on the addition give it a contemporary feel, while the horizontal placement pays tribute to the traditional cypress planks on the existing structure.

  • Before image of the front facade.

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    Before image of the front facade.

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    McConnell Photography

    Before image of the front facade.

  • Before image showing the rear elevation and unappealing back yard.

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    Before image showing the rear elevation and unappealing back yard.

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    McConnell Photography

    Before image showing the rear elevation and unappealing back yard.

  • Before Floor Plan

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    Before Floor Plan

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    Courtesy Webber + Studio

    Before Floor Plan

  • After Floor Plan

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    After Floor Plan

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    Courtesy Webber + Studio

    After Floor Plan

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    Courtesy Webber + Studio

    The Addition's Upper Level Plan

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    Courtesy Webber + Studio

Architect David Webber usually steers his clients toward green design, but this project’s owners wanted a sustainable house from the start. While a modest budget precluded a lot of flashy green features, adhering to smart design principles and keeping materials natural, local, and non-toxic helped garner a rare 5-star rating from Austin Energy.

Despite the high rating on this infill remodel and 1,000-square-foot addition, which doubled the existing home’s size, Webber feels some of the most sensible design ideas didn’t get any credit. Creating strong indoor-outdoor connections, a flexible floor plan, and diverse types of space are a few such examples that Webber incorporated to make this compact house—that’s walkable to retail and mass transit—livable longer for the owners and their growing family.

That malleability of spaces, both inside and out, along with Webber’s elegant use of durable materials immediately caught the jury’s attention. Standing-seam metal roofing wraps down the side of the second-story master to shield its wrap-around balcony. The second floor cantilevers out over the kitchen’s insulated, double-paned glass walls to create a covered patio. Webber kept the dim, cool atmosphere of the original house as the living room, in contrast to sunny kitchen and dining areas in the new space. Recessed steel and glass doors separate old and new while bringing light into the center of the house. This slight separation allows the volumes to maintain individual but complementary styles.

All of these details work together to make this 1,970-square-foot house live large. “The more you can create smaller spaces that are comfortable for clients,” Webber says, “the more resources and energy consumption you save.” 


PRODUCTS
Windows: Marvin Integrity / Roofing: Central Texas Metal Roofing Supply / Insulation: Icynene / Countertops: Caesarstone / Bath Faucets, Showerheads: Kohler / Toilets: Toto / Flooring: Locally source pecan / Paints & Stains: Eco-Wise; Pittsburgh Paints / HVAC: Trane; Rinnai
Click here to see all 2010 EHDA winners.