image via Spoon & Tamago 
image via Spoon & Tamago 

An earthquake resistant office has been unveiled in Nomi City of Ishikawa Prefecture in Japan. The building, resembling a giant spider web, is the world’s first seismic reinforcement structure made with carbon fiber material, and was designed by world-famous Japanese architect Kengo Kuma.

image via Spoon & Tamago 
image via Spoon & Tamago 

The three-story building, fa-bo, is an office and laboratory constructed for Komatsu Seiren, a Japanese fabric manufacturer. Located in an active earthquake zone, the client wanted a building that would be able to withstand earthquakes or tsunamis.

The material is unusual. It’s something that we dreamed of but was unable to realize until now. We believe that this flexible anti-seismic reinforcement is quite an accomplishment.

Bearing that need in mind, Kuma decided to renovate the client’s former office building by setting up carbon fibers outside, to strengthen the architecture against natural crisis. Outfitted with minimalistic concrete, fa-bo is strong and stable enough to sustain harsh weather conditions, earthquakes, and floods.

image via Spoon & Tamago 
image via Spoon & Tamago 

The building also features a showroom with exhibits and workshops that are open to visitors interested in fabric crafting. On top of fa-bo is a roof garden with a great view of Mt. Haku.

image via Spoon & Tamago 
image via Spoon & Tamago 

In this video, architect Kengo Kuma talks about the building's structure. 


Head over to Spoon & Tamago  or Japan Trends for more details about this project.