Courtesy Luis Gallardo

When life bestows you six polyester arches, make a home with them. Or at least that was the mindset of the clients that inherited these structures dating back to experimental architect Juan José Diaz Infante’s modular housing project, Kalikosmia, which was realized in 1970.

Courtesy Luis Gallardo

Productora, a Mexico City–based architectural studio, took on the task of recycling these found objects to create one 970-square-foot home on a plot of land in Tlayacapan, Morelos, Mexico—a town located in central Mexico one hour outside of the capitol. Reassembling the pieces was the first priority, which was achieved by forcing the archways together, and then covering them with a new sheath of polyester and fiberglass. From the outside, the finished product is a voluminous, space-age home with multiple entrances. Structural support is provided by a rectangular concrete plinth, which extends up the bases of the “petals” of the flower-shaped home. This element also raised it a meter above ground level, providing more building space to create larger interiors.

Courtesy Luis Gallardo

The designers decided to situate the residence in the very middle of the plot to leave space for the pool and guest rooms built in the back. The simple, clean geometry of the surrounding built environment's other spaces lets the central Mexican home take the limelight. Their natural textures fall into the background, letting the ethereal impression of the refurbished modules' gleaming surface shine through.

Courtesy Luis Gallardo
Courtesy Luis Gallardo
The building plans for the recycled home in Tlayacapan, Mexico, visualizing how the concrete plinth provides a support system.
Courtesy Productora The building plans for the recycled home in Tlayacapan, Mexico, visualizing how the concrete plinth provides a support system.